Month: May 2021

WASHINGTON — Eutelsat’s investment in OneWeb may be incompatible with continued participation in the European Union’s proposed satellite broadband constellation, an EU official warned. Eutelsat is part of an industry consortium that received a study contract from the European Commission in December 2020 to examine the feasibility of a European satellite constellation to provide secure
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Originally published by U.S. Department of the Interior WASHINGTON — Secretary of the Interior Deb Haaland, National Climate Advisor Gina McCarthy, Under Secretary of Defense for Policy Dr. Colin Kahl, and California Governor Gavin Newsom today announced an agreement to advance areas for offshore wind off the northern and central coasts of California. This significant milestone
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SAN FRANCISCO – At the direction of the Biden Administration, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s National Environmental Satellite, Data and Information Service (NESDIS) is adopting a portfolio approach. “For us that means not just launching one satellite at a time and building that satellite really well, but seeing how all the systems work together,”
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‘Icequakes’ rippled through the ice on Mount Erebus in Antarctica after two huge and distant earthquakes. Credit: George Holton/Science Photo Library Solid Earth sciences 25 May 2021 Antarctic volcano trembles in the wake of distant quakes Seismic activity is unleashed at the world’s southernmost active volcano by major earthquakes in Chile and the Indian Ocean.
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By: Hannah Pell Image credit: ProtoDUNE / CERN. Why does matter exist in the universe? Can we find evidence of proton decay, supporting Einstein’s dream of unified forces? These questions, among a host of others, are very much open for debate within high-energy physics, and one particle has the potential to help answer all of
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In this article AMZN Washington, DC Attorney General Karl Racine speaks after a news conference in front of the U.S. Supreme Court September 9, 2019 in Washington, DC. Alex Wong Washington, D.C. Attorney General Karl Racine announced Tuesday he’s suing Amazon on antitrust grounds, claiming the company’s practices have unfairly raised prices for consumers and
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Do you wait to charge your phones battery until it’s close to dying? If you do- surprise! You’re doing it wrong. Hosted by: Michael Aranda SciShow has a spinoff podcast! It’s called SciShow Tangents. Check it out at http://www.scishowtangents.org ———- Support SciShow by becoming a patron on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/scishow ———- Dooblydoo thanks go to the
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An appearance of a wild giant river otter on the Bermejo River in Argentina surprised conservationists of Fundación Rewilding Argentina, having feared that these river otters have gone extinct in the country due to loss of habitat and hunting activity in north-east Argentina’s Chaco province. Sebastián Di Martino, director of conservation at Fundación Rewilding Argentina
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A sign is still posted on the front door of the Wolfeboro Food Co-op that reads, “Face masks required.” Until recently, another sign had hung directly below it, explaining how the New Hampshire market was following federal policy. Erin Perkins, manager of the shop, removed that second sign on 14 May — the day after
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Listen to a recap of the top stories of the day from Electrek. Quick Charge is available now on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, TuneIn and our RSS feed for Overcast and other podcast players. New episodes of Quick Charge are recorded Monday through Thursday and again on Saturday. Subscribe to our podcast in Apple Podcast or your favorite podcast player to guarantee
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Wind is essential for our zero emissions future because it is a clean fuel energy source, is cost-effective, and can be built on existing farms or land or offshore. Oh, yeah — it’s renewable and infinite, too. When humans moved from a nomadic to agricultural existence, few asked, “Why is wind important?” That’s because early
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Microplastics are everywhere — but are they harmful? Read by Benjamin Thompson Your browser does not support the audio element. Download MP3 Wherever they look – from the bottom of oceans to the top of mountains – researchers are uncovering tiny specks of plastic, known as microplastics. Scientists are trying to understand the potential impacts
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Lordstown Motors Corp Chief Executive Steve Burns poses with a prototype of the electric vehicle start-up’s Endurance pickup truck, which it will begin building in the second half of 2021, at the company’s plant in Lordstown, Ohio, U.S. June 25, 2020. Lordstown Motors | Reuters Shares of Lordstown Motors tumbled more than 9% during after-hours
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At GeneXus, we build software that builds software. A robot or artificial intelligence, not a human, writes the code for new apps. The company, which I co-founded in 1988, is also working on small autonomous vehicles for agrobusiness. The prototype in this picture — at our global headquarters in Montevideo — which I helped to
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The people around you have a lot more to do with how you think than you might realize. Hosted by: Hank Green ———- Support SciShow by becoming a patron on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/scishow ———- Dooblydoo thanks go to the following Patreon supporters—Kevin, Bealer, Mark Terrio-Cameron, KatieMarie Magnone, Patrick Merrithew, Charles Southerland, Fatima Iqbal, Sultan Alkhulaifi, Tim
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Hank tells the story of the mysterious star known as “Methuseleh,” and why scientists think that it is the oldest known star in the universe. Like SciShow? Want to help support us, and also get things to put on your walls, cover your torso and hold your liquids? Tardigrade Poster: http://vid.io/xom SciShow Mug: http://vid.io/xoa SciShow
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