Nature

Rivers are a major source of renewable water, and provide food, jobs and a sense of place and cultural identity for people living in the vicinity. For many Indigenous peoples, rivers are central to how they understand themselves, their origins and their relationships to the rest of nature. As a citizen of the Penobscot Nation
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Scientists have determined that for the first time in Earth’s history, the manmade mass of materials may now be outweighing all other life forms on Earth. They revealed their findings last Wednesday in a research that details this “crossover point” wherein the footprint of humanity is much heavier compared to the natural world. According to
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Hello Nature readers, would you like to get this Briefing in your inbox free every day? Sign up here Dams are just one type of infrastructure that can cause environmental damage.huseyintuncer/iStock/Getty The mass of human-made things just exceeded Earth’s total living biomass. Researchers compared the estimated dry weight of all living things on our planet
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Many US regions have drinking water exposed to high amounts of arsenic. The national study on public water systems in the country discovered that levels of arsenic are not the same, despite the latest implemented national regulatory standard. Study assessed the differences in the arsenic content of public drinking water, separating them by subgroups geographically. It was conducted by scientists of
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Children rarely show symptoms of COVID-19, even if they are infected.Credit: Thomas Lohnes/Getty Young children account for only a small percentage of COVID-19 infections1 — a trend that has puzzled scientists. Now, a growing body of evidence suggests why: kids’ immune systems seem better equipped to eliminate SARS-CoV-2 than are adults’. “Children are very much
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South Africa’s publication-incentive scheme offers cash rewards when researchers publish journal papers.Credit: Shutterstock A survey of nearly 1,000 academic researchers in South Africa suggests that the majority are in favour of keeping a government scheme that offers cash rewards for publishing research papers in accredited journals, even though they agree that this can promote unethical
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1. Renard, D. & Tilman, D. National food production stabilized by crop diversity. Nature 571, 257–260 (2019). CAS  Article  Google Scholar  2. Mehrabi, Z. & Ramankutty, N. Synchronized failure of global crop production. Nat. Ecol. Evol. 3, 780–786 (2019). Article  Google Scholar  3. Cottrell, R. S. et al. Food production shocks across land and sea.
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At 8 a.m. on 1 December, the Arecibo telescope’s instrument platform crashed into the dish below, tearing more gashes into an already damaged structure.Credit: Ricardo Arduengo/AFP via Getty Arecibo telescope collapses in gut-wrenching display The iconic radio telescope at the Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico has collapsed, leaving astronomers and the Puerto Rican scientific community
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Last Monday, the EPA or US Environmental Protection Agency finalized its decision for setting limits on the amount of a certain type of air pollutant known as fine particulate matter or PM2.5. This limit, which is previously set, will now remain officially unchanged, despite the scientific research findings which say that more stringent limits or standards need to be imposed for it to save
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Giant pandas have thick coats but sometimes don an extra outer layer against the winter’s chill. Credit: Fuwen Wei Animal behaviour 08 December 2020 A steaming pile holds allure for giant pandas, especially at one time of year. Wild giant pandas sometimes mess up their neat black and white outfits by rolling in horse manure
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Salmon raised in factory farms and indoor tanks are now trending, with factory farms using inland tanks in the US are an alternative solution against the decreasing stocks of wild Atlantic salmon. Wild Atlantic salmon have been threatened by polluting textile, saw, and paper mills as well as the dams constructed by the hundreds for power generation. Alternative farming methods
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An intense windstorm in Melbourne over the weekend flooded the suburb town of Hillside with almost waist-deep tumbleweed, stunning the residents with amazement and inconvenience.  The windstorm and tumbleweed flooding led to more than 200 calls to the State Emergency Service in the span of seven hours.  Other than a storm of tumbleweed, residents also reported downed
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I have just spent six months in the Great Barrier Reef on the research vessel Falkor. Every cruise tackles cutting-edge science and, as lead technician, I’ve been able to witness so many firsts: the RV Falkor is the first ship to map much of this area at high resolution, and to put a remotely operated
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The Great Barrier Reef, or GBR in Australia, a UNESCO World Heritage site, now has an IUCN status of “critical” because of climate change. This is the most spectacular and biggest coral reef system globally, which used to have a health status of “significant concern.” This status is based on the classification system set by the IUCN or the International Union for Conservation of
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The Prime Minister (PM) of UK has committed to cutting greenhouse gas emissions by 68% by the year 2030, which is based on 1990 levels. According to the NAO or National Audit Office, this will affect our travel, our work, and our home heating, and our meat production. According to an NAO report, cutting carbon dioxide emissions is uncertain, although allowing temperature rise
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A common component chemical of tires has recently been discovered as the cause of the mysterious deaths of Coho salmon. Mysterious deaths It has been observed for several decades how coho salmon in urban streams living in the Pacific Northwestern region have been dying. Seattle started restoring the habitats of salmon during the 1990s and found that a maximum of 90 percent
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Made, not born: blood-making stem cells (pictured) originate from cells that line the blood vessels. Credit: Steve Gschmeissner/SPL Stem cells 03 December 2020 Sugars ‘write’ a signal that helps embryonic cells to transition to a vital new job. A ‘sugar code’ on the cells that pave the inside of blood vessels plays an important part
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A team of conservationists, government officials, and local community members braved crocodile-infested waters and pulled off a successful rescue operation of a giraffe named Asiwa from a shrinking island in Kenya, the first of the eight giraffes that are due for rescue in the succeeding days.  The rescue operation entailed the construction of a giraffe-safe barge to
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Farmers who work in fields in India are especially at risk of getting bitten by snakes such as the Russell’s viper (Daboia russelii) shown here.Credit: John Benjamin Owens, MEFGL Bangor University/Captive & Field Herpetology Snakebites annually cost India’s citizens the equivalent of 3 million years of health and productivity. That figure, reported at a meeting
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Human waste and the lack of adequate toilet facilities in US National Parks harm wildlife and streams, but an entrepreneur proposes a neat solution. For two decades, Mt Rainier national park ranger Richard Lechleitner dug human waste from backcountry toilets to carry it down from the mountains. Dirty toilets Washington state park staff deal with thousands of visitors and climbers to the 14,000-foot
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Credit: Getty Literature reviews are important resources for scientists. They provide historical context for a field while offering opinions on its future trajectory. Creating them can provide inspiration for one’s own research, as well as some practice in writing. But few scientists are trained in how to write a review — or in what constitutes
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Crews living on Mars (artist’s impression) could survive on oxygen extracted from the salty water that permeates some of the planet’s soils. Credit: NASA/Clouds AO/SEArch Chemistry 04 December 2020 Water locked away in Martian sediments could be split into the gases needed by humans and their machines. A device that uses electricity to decompose water
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Two reports have been published by doctors pointing to climate change being the culprit in many illnesses and premature death, detailing the influence of global warming on human health. Comprehensive report World Meteorological Organization researchers published a report which showed the effect of the warmest decade on the health of millions of people, as they experienced extreme heat, wildfires, and floods this year,
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This photonic computer performed in 200 seconds a calculation that on an ordinary supercomputer would take 2.5 billion years to complete.Credit: Hansen Zhong A team in China claims to have made the first definitive demonstration of ‘quantum advantage’ — exploiting the counter-intuitive workings of quantum mechanics to perform computations that would be prohibitively slow on
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Hurricane Maria battered homes for three years which until now, thousands of people in Puerto Rico are still longing for a safe shelter that is resilient to the climate crisis. A couple introduced a new construction technique that would aid house owners in making SuperAdobe homes, a climate-resilient home from cheap materials. SuperAdobe Homes   Paula
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Scientists can transform a microscopic particle (above) from barium-based to cadmium-based without sacrificing its complex form. Credit: H.C. Hendrikse et al./Adv. Mater. Materials science 03 December 2020 Self-assembling particles exhibit a mind-boggling array of structure and composition. In a neat chemical sleight-of-hand, researchers can swap out the ions in microscopic structures without disturbing the structures’
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Do you need a postdoc to thrive as a scientist outside academia? Julie Gould explores the pros and cons with industry insiders. Your browser does not support the audio element. Download MP3 Nessa Carey, a UK entrepreneur and technology-transfer professional whose career has straddled academia and industry, including a senior role at Pfizer, shares insider
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A 63-year-old man was arrested for what the Hongkong Customs officers describe as their biggest seizure of endangered seahorses in two years as authorities found 75 kg of dried seahorses, valued at HK$1 million (US$129,000) during an operation against illegal wildlife trade on Wednesday.  The operation against the illegal wildlife trade  The authorities found that 25 kg of the
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William Frankland, who popularized the pollen count and who died earlier this year aged 108, likened the role of an allergist to that of a detective. Superior powers of observation, chance encounters and the rejection of evidence that initially seems compelling have all delivered breakthroughs in allergy medicine. For instance, for many years, guidelines advised
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Hundreds of people evacuate from Mount Semeru volcano in Java, Indonesia as it erupts and exudes lava and ash. Locals fled from homes when the rumbling volcano started spewing hot ash up to thousands of meters out into the atmosphere. It also belched dangerous lava from its crater. Erupting Mount Semeru The active volcano Mount Semeru is located on the island of Java in Indonesia. Yesterday, it
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