Nature

1. Snider, E. et al. Room-temperature superconductivity in a carbonaceous sulfur hydride. Nature 586, 373–377 (2020). ADS  CAS  Article  Google Scholar  2. Tinkham, M. Introduction to Superconductivity (McGraw Hill, 1996). 3. Pickard, C. J., Errea, I. & Eremets, M. I. Superconducting hydrides under pressure. Annu. Rev. Condens. Matter Phys. 11, 57–76 (2020). CAS  Article  Google
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Department of Cancer Biology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA Yunhua Liu, Cecil Han, Guohui Wan, Anil K. Sood & Xiongbin Lu Department of Gynaecologic Oncology and Reproductive Medicine, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, USA Xinna Zhang, Cristina Ivan, Dahai Jiang & Anil K. Sood Center for RNA Interference and Non-coding RNAs, The University of
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An innovative imaging technique captures how a gel deforms (arrows and colours) as a crack propagates through it. Credit: S. Aime et al./Phys. Rev. Lett. Optics and photonics 25 August 2021 Scattered light yields full picture of tiny motions Optical technique overcomes limitations of standard imaging methods. Share on Twitter Share on Twitter Share on
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NEWS 25 August 2021 Preprint ban in grant applications deemed ‘plain ludicrous’ The Australian Research Council’s decision to reject early career funding applications that mention preprints is hopelessly outdated, say scientists. Clare Watson 0 Clare Watson Clare Watson is a freelance science journalist in Wollongong, Australia. View author publications You can also search for this
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CORRESPONDENCE 24 August 2021 First authors: is co-equal genuinely equal? Jonathan Kipnis 0 Jonathan Kipnis Washington University in St. Louis, St Louis, Missouri, USA. View author publications You can also search for this author in PubMed  Google Scholar Share on Twitter Share on Twitter Share on Facebook Share on Facebook Share via E-Mail Share via
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BOOK REVIEW 24 August 2021 Shells, sweat, and the fear of strangers: Books in brief Andrew Robinson reviews five of the week’s best science picks. Andrew Robinson 0 Andrew Robinson Andrew Robinson’s many books include Lost Languages: The Enigma of the World’s Undeciphered Scripts and Einstein on the Run: How Britain Saved the World’s Greatest
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NEWS AND VIEWS 23 August 2021 Protein-structure prediction revolutionized The full might of a world-leading artificial-intelligence laboratory has been brought to bear on protein-structure prediction. The resulting method, AlphaFold2, promises to transform our understanding of proteins. Mohammed AlQuraishi 0 Mohammed AlQuraishi Mohammed AlQuraishi is in the Columbia University Irving Medical Center, Columbia University, New York,
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NEWS 23 August 2021 Genetic patterns offer clues to evolution of homosexuality Massive study finds that genetic markers associated with same-sex encounters might aid reproduction. But some scientists question the conclusions. Sara Reardon Sara Reardon View author publications You can also search for this author in PubMed  Google Scholar Share on Twitter Share on Twitter
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Download PDF The blue ‘string art’ here is an example of a ruled surface, a complex shape that you can generate by moving a simple straight line. The white object is a Clebsch surface, another complex surface that is based on simple equations. On the lower left are red dice of different shapes, which I
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Language, more than anything else, characterizes human nature. Speech, or the vocal production of language, necessitates fine control of our vocal articulators, which includes the tongue, lips, and jaw. Every baby faces the task of learning to regulate the vocal articulators, precisely enough to make spoken sounds. Babbling is when infants begin to generate their
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NATURE BRIEFING 19 August 2021 Daily briefing: Health researchers report pressure to suppress results Survey finds that government-funded trials sometimes face efforts to suppress results. Plus, hopeful signs for a ‘pan-coronavirus’ vaccine and a rare pair of all-white orca whales. Flora Graham Flora Graham View author publications You can also search for this author in
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NEWS 20 August 2021 Home seismometers provide crucial data on Haiti’s quake A volunteer network helps to monitor aftershocks and illuminate the country’s earthquake hazards. Alexandra Witze Alexandra Witze View author publications You can also search for this author in PubMed  Google Scholar Share on Twitter Share on Twitter Share on Facebook Share on Facebook
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Download PDF There’s only so much flying a man can do, even if you’re not a man any longer. Sure, you have the power, and have drunk up all the fuel your boots’ propulsion systems could burn, pushing you forever onward to the next habitable world. Sure, you have a crock-pot-sized fusion reactor juicing your
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NEWS 20 August 2021 The mutation that helps Delta spread like wildfire A key amino-acid change might underlie the coronavirus variant’s ferocious infectivity. Ewen Callaway Ewen Callaway View author publications You can also search for this author in PubMed  Google Scholar Share on Twitter Share on Twitter Share on Facebook Share on Facebook Share via
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The summit of Greenland’s ice sheet has just experienced rainfall for the first time in recorded history, in yet another disturbing milestone in our ecological unravelling. Like most parts of the Northern Hemisphere, Greenland has been experiencing an intense heatwave with temperatures at the summit of the glacier increasing above freezing for the third time
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Appalachian Botanical Company is converting portions of a depleted strip mine in Boone County, West Virginia, into a fragrant utopia of  lavender flowers and swarming honey bees. Former strip mines aren’t the first location that springs to mind when it comes to sustainable agriculture, beekeeping, or the wellness sector. However, an initiative in southeastern West
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NEWS 19 August 2021 Baby bats babble like human infants Repeated vocalizations could help young bats to practise the sounds they will need as adults. Max Kozlov Max Kozlov View author publications You can also search for this author in PubMed  Google Scholar Share on Twitter Share on Twitter Share on Facebook Share on Facebook
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Following a years-long court struggle, the Biden administration has banned a pesticide linked to causing brain damage in children, including lower IQ, loss of working memory, and attention deficit problems. (Photo : Photo by Cleyder Duque from Pexels) Banning Chlorpyrifos on Foods (Photo : Photo credit: Pixabay) Officials from the Environmental Protection Agency said that chlorpyrifos
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This soft prosthetic hand allows the wearer to grasp delicate objects such as cakes and berries. Credit: G. Gu et al./Nature Biomed. Eng. Engineering 18 August 2021 A tough prosthetic hand obeys the muscles’ commands The inexpensive and lightweight prosthesis also provides feedback akin to a sense of touch. Share on Twitter Share on Twitter
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A Sumatran orangutan named Padana raps nuts with a log ‘hammer’ atop a tree stump ‘anvil’, a technique she invented herself. Credit: Claudio Tennie Animal behaviour 18 August 2021 Clever orangutans invent nutcrackers from scratch Chimpanzees are not the only great apes to develop tools without tutoring. Share on Twitter Share on Twitter Share on
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Rice planting in China releases the potent greenhouse gas methane. Those emissions contribute to making rice grown in China a generally less climate-friendly crop per calorie than potato. Credit: Costfoto/Barcroft Media/Getty Sustainability 18 August 2021 Can Chinese diners embrace potatoes? The answer could affect Earth’s climate A switch to spuds in a country where rice
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People gather at a pump in India to collect groundwater. Accessible, fresh water makes up only a fraction of the water in Earth’s crust. Credit: Jack Laurenson/Lnp/Shutterstock Water resources 17 August 2021 A staggering store of water is revealed in Earth’s crust Modelling work shows that crustal groundwater accounts for more water than the world’s
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CORRESPONDENCE 17 August 2021 Bespoke open databases would be cheaper and easier to analyse Nikolaus Obwegeser  ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0003-3404-1989 0 , Henrik M. Rønnow  ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-8832-8865 1 & Tomoko Yokoi  ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-6671-2946 2 Nikolaus Obwegeser Bern University of Applied Sciences, Bern, Switzerland View author publications You can also search for this author in PubMed  Google Scholar
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NEWS AND VIEWS 16 August 2021 ‘Polluter pays’ policy could speed up emission reductions and removal of atmospheric CO2 To meet climate targets, technologies that remove atmospheric carbon dioxide will probably be needed. An analysis shows how their development and use could be accelerated if carbon emitters are obliged to remove their own CO2. David
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Download PDF In my work as a quantum engineer, I wear two hats. At the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) in London, where this photo was taken in April, I research quantum metrology, the scientific study of measurements based on quantum-physics principles. The instrument in this image is a dilution refrigerator, which allows us to cool
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CAREER COLUMN 13 August 2021 How I tackled post-PhD imposter syndrome Kelsey Inouye’s job search gave her panic attacks and dented her self-esteem. But she learnt to take rejection in her stride. Kelsey Inouye 0 Kelsey Inouye Kelsey Inouye is a research assistant at the University of Oxford, UK, focusing on researcher development and careers.
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